Icon in Brown’s Wood

Icon in Brown’s Wood

Icon in Brown’s Wood

37 Laurel Dr, Lincoln, MA 01773, USA

Coming Soon, For Sale

$1,400,000

  • DSC05011-HDR
  • front_night_web
  • DSC05038-HDR
  • DSC05035-HDR
  • DSC05057-HDR
  • DSC05067-HDR
  • DSC05072-HDR
  • DSC05077-HDR
  • DSC05082-HDR
  • DSC05126-HDR
  • DSC05129-HDR
  • DSC05122-HDR
  • DSC05112-HDR
  • DSC05107-HDR
  • DSC05092-HDR
  • DSC05087-HDR
  • DSC05133-HDR
  • DSC05143-HDR
  • DSC05148-HDR
  • DSC05153-HDR
  • DSC05224-HDR
  • DSC05229-HDR
  • DSC05239-HDR
  • DSC05249-HDR
  • DSC05260-HDR
  • DSC05256-HDR
  • DSC05191-HDR
  • DSC05265-HDR
  • DSC05173-HDR
  • keeprs
  • DSC05179-HDR
  • grid_night_web
  • lincoln lion gate

Property ID :

 None

Bedrooms
3
Bathrooms
2
Garage
1
Area
3190 S.F.
Year Built
1957
Lot Size
1.06 Acres

Description

Coming April 4. Private showings by appointment only. Contact us here or via below form. Monitoring the guidelines from federal and state authorities, and those of Compass, MAR, and NAR  regarding the Covid 19 novel virus. See end of post for more details. 

Located at the top of the cul-de-sac in the Modernist enclave of Brown’s Wood in Lincoln, 37 Laurel Drive is a dazzling International Style Mid-Century-Modern home. The house was designed by Walter Pierce, who planned and developed the pioneering Peacock Farm neighborhood in Lexington, and the “Peacock Farm House” design built first there (and soon replicated in other neighborhoods and towns). Unlike the Peacock Farm House, 37 Laurel is closer in design to Pierce’s own home and informed by Bauhaus and West Coast-via-Japan architectural principles. Indeed, the house is reminiscent of Marcel Breuer’s own house, also in Lincoln.

The property offers what so many buyers are seeking in Lincoln: walls of glass allowing natural light to suffuse the rooms and bring the outdoors in; an updated open floor plan in the main living area; a setting within the terrain at the end of the street not far from Valley Pond; and perhaps most significantly, a cohesive neighborhood with historic significance in an otherwise sparsely-settled woodsy town. The home offers an urbane sense of style and design. The property also comes with a highly coveted membership share in Valley Pond for swimming and (non-motor) boating. There are three bedrooms; two full baths; a master suite; a detached garage; and natural gas for cooking and heating.

If this house looks familiar with you, perhaps it was because it was a location in the 2019 movie, Knives Out.

 

Chris Evans in the living room.

Some Notes

  • Chan/Krieger Architects worked with the current owners on relocating the kitchen and other changes. The firm later merged with NBBJ. Decks were completely rebuilt.
  • Landscape designer, Diana Thomas, worked with current owners
  • Kitchen features six-burner natural gas range two Bosch wall ovens, and an LG refrigerator
  • Current owners added sliding glass doors
  • Garage added 2000
  • Roofs replaced in sections within roughly the past 10-15 years
  • Included: washer/dryer; all appliances; grill; master bedroom shelving (behind bed)
  • Outdoor perimeter keeps house dry
  • Disclosures: Master bedroom is open to living area below; damaged sill section in bedroom wing being replaced in April; Irrigation system as-is and not being used
  • Most original fixed-glass windows have been preserved

 

Here is a vintage shot.

Appointments and actual availability for showings will be arranged accordingly. No open houses. Showings only on April 4 and 5. Per owners: buyers & agents MUST bring masks, hand sanitizer or gloves, remove shoes (no booties). No touching anything. Must have 2020 pre-approval/proof of funds. Must be okay with the master suite being open to the below main living area.

The Neighborhood

Brown’s Wood is a neighborhood of 23 modernist homes built in the 1950s, designed by the era’s finest local modernist architects, and nestled into wooded lots on Laurel Drive, Moccasin Hill, and Conant Road in Lincoln.

The project began in May 1953 when a group of young families, inspired by Walden II and the utopian vision of Ann and Ranny Gras, met at MIT. Further inspiration came from similar planned (intentional) modernist developments, Six Moon Hill, Peacock Farm, and Five Fields in Lexington, Snake Hill in Belmont, Conantum in Concord, and Kendal Commons in Weston, some of which were built concurrent to Brown’s Wood. In 1954 Brown’s Wood was incorporated and those who had purchased options for the 23 lots reviewed and approved each member’s individual plans for houses — no Ranches, Colonials, or Capes allowed! The initial group included engineers, scientists, musicians, artists, editors, a photojournalist, and other professionals. Each house was eventually deeded a share in Valley Pond, a large swimming, boating, and recreational resource in the neighborhood, developed under the leadership of members of Brown’s Wood for the larger Lincoln/Weston community. Brown’s Wood differed from the aforementioned neighborhoods in that it was the only of the group not conceived by an architectural firm, developer, or builder. This was the project of a group of private individuals who did the work of planning, layout, incorporation, and zoning. This was set before Lincoln switched to two-acre zoning.

The architects who were commissioned included:

From research materials: A General Statement of the Historical Architectural or Other Qualities of Brown’s Wood That Make it Appropriate for Designation as a Neighborhood Conservation District and The Brown’s Wood Story (Ruth Wales). Click below to see Ruth’s story:

:

 

Features

Floor Plans

Combined Floor Plans

Property Video

  • 37 Laurel

Map

Agent Bill Janovitz and John Tse

Unless otherwise noted, all of our listings are handled by Bill and John as sellers' agents. Other team members are… View My Listings